Genomic Medicine Centre

The South London Genomic Medicine Centre (GMC), hosted by Guy’s and St Thomas’, is one of the centres taking part in the 100,000 Genomes Project.

It is a partnership between:

  • four NHS trusts: Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust and St George’s Healthcare NHS Trust
  • two universities: King’s College London and St George’s University of London
  • two patient organisations: Macmillan Cancer Support and Genetic Alliance UK
  • two Academic Health Science Networks: covering South London (Health Innovation Network) and Kent, Surrey and Sussex
  • one Academic Health Science Centre: King’s Health Partners.

100,000 Genomes ProjectThe NHS trusts, including Guy’s and St Thomas’, will be responsible for recruiting suitable patients and their relatives to the programme, for collecting blood and tumour samples, and for extracting the DNA from these samples. Macmillan Cancer Support and Genetic Alliance UK, as well as partners and networks across South London and Kent, Surrey and Sussex, will help with patient engagement and communications to the public. The universities will also play a key part in genomic research and education.

Professor Sean Whittaker, clinical lead for the Genomics Network Alliance and consultant dermatologist at Guy's and St Thomas', says: “We look forward to helping transform clinical practice through genomics. Our partnership recognises that our ability to deliver the 100,000 Genomes Project and transform genomic diagnostics across healthcare in the South East depends on harnessing all the talents across our partner organisations.

"Professor Frances Flinter, consultant clinical geneticist at Guy's and St Thomas', adds: “This is a really exciting opportunity for us to learn a lot more about the underlying causes of rare diseases and cancers. The results will lead to improved, personalised treatments for many patients and will deliver a legacy across the NHS of faster, cost effective, diagnostic genetic tests and a more highly skilled workforce.”

It aims to deliver approximately 10,500 successfully sequenced DNA samples by the end of 2017, across cancer and rare diseases. 

This is a really exciting opportunity for us to learn a lot more about the underlying causes of rare diseases and cancers.

Professor Frances Flinter, consultant in clinical genetics