Paralympian Scott Moorhouse inspires amputees


Posted on Tuesday 12 November 2013
Patient Steven Onasanya (left) with Scott Moorhouse

Patient Steven Onasanya (left) with Paralympic athlete Scott Moorhouse

Paralympic athlete Scott Moorhouse urged amputee patients to aim high and strive to be the very best as he officially opened a state-of-the-art rehabilitation unit in south London on Friday 8 November.

The new unit at Lambeth Community Care Centre is run by Guy's and St Thomas’ community staff to help people who have had lower or upper limb amputations to get mobile and become independent again after surgery.

A dedicated team of therapists, nurses, prosthetists, podiatrists and psychological counsellors provides intensive rehabilitation to 100 amputees a year.

Scott Moorhouse lost his leg when he was just six-weeks-old after a childhood accident but he hasn’t let his disability hold him back.

He was plucked from hundreds of hopefuls during a talent spotting event for people with sporting potential in 2008 and he achieved a life-long ambition by representing Team GB in the London Paralympics.

Scott says: “When I was growing up sport was all around me - at school, at the army base where we lived, and I watched the likes of Steve Backley and Jonathan Edwards on the TV with my Nan.

“For me, sport was my rehabilitation. I have never had the use of my leg so from the start I just got up and got on with it.

“But after visiting Headley Court (the state-of-the-art rehabilitation unit for military personnel) I can see just how vital the Amputee Rehabilitation Unit at the Lambeth Community Care Centre is.

“I would say to anyone who has had an amputation ‘never give up because the best is still to come’.”

The unit includes a gym and award-winning landscaped gardens where amputees practise walking and learn how to improve their balance.

Angela McCrae, head of specialist regional rehabilitation, says: “When patients come to us they are at the very beginning of their journey. We help them to learn all the skills that they need to live as an amputee and to get walking again.

“By working closely with hospital staff we can make sure that patients are discharged from hospital as soon as possible after surgery.

“With our help patients are able to adjust to the loss of a limb in a bright, comfortable and healing environment.”

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