Black and minority ethnic pioneers leading the way in healthcare


Posted on Friday 29 November 2013
HSJ BME pioneers - Comfort Momoh, Daghni Rajasingam, Staynton Brown and Naledi Kline

From top: Comfort Momoh, Daghni Rajasingam, Staynton Brown and Naledi Kline

Four black and minority ethnic (BME) staff at Guy's and St Thomas' are among the top 50 BME pioneers in healthcare, according to the Health Service Journal magazine.

The BME pioneers list, announced on Wednesday 27 November, ‘celebrates people who – through their exceptional leadership, passion and outstanding abilities – are helping to create and deliver excellent care for all’. The pioneers were nominated by colleagues and members of the public. 

Ann Macintyre, Director of Workforce, says: “I’m really proud to have four members of staff nominated in this list. It would be fantastic to have one person nominated, but to have four exemplary role models in our organisation is exceptional. They demonstrate the importance of innovation and clinical leadership, and are an inspiration.

“More than 200 languages are spoken in the local communities we care for, and it’s important that our workforce is equally as diverse.”

Staynton Brown (Associate Director of Equality and Human Rights), Comfort Momoh (specialist midwife in female genital mutilation and public health specialist), Naledi Kline (Head of Professional Standards, Health Visiting and School Nursing), and Dr Daghni Rajasingam (Lead of the Birth Centre and consultant obstetrician), were chosen by a panel of judges from hundreds of nominees.

Staynton Brown says: “At Guy’s and St Thomas’, we are committed to providing an environment equally welcoming to people of all backgrounds, cultures, nationalities and religions so we can attract the most talented workforce. I’m lucky to be able to make a small contribution to making a difference.”

Comfort Momoh says: "I'm thrilled to have made this list. I work with inspiring women and young girls who have been or are in danger of being at risk from harmful traditional practices like female genital mutilation.

“My work is focused on raising awareness, empowering women and research into FGM and I'm pleased to be recognised for that.”

Naledi Kline says: “I’m delighted. For the past two decades I have tried to lead by example by supporting staff to improve NHS services.

“I would like to thank all those who nominated me and I’m committed to continuing to develop leadership skills within my current role." 

Dr Daghni Rajasingam says: “I feel honoured to have made it onto the list, and I hope it will inspire other BME clinicians to take on leadership roles. I’m privileged to work with fantastic clinicians and we are all committed to improving services for all our patients.” 


 

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