Cancer research

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About our research

Our clinical trials team works closely with the oncology and haematology medical teams to recruit patients to our trials and to ensure patients are monitored closely throughout.

We have a large portfolio of phase II and III trials that are split into teams for specific tumour groups. We also have a team dedicated to early phase trials and we run weekly early phase clinics in the clinical research facility. We attract commercial and non-commercial trials, ranging from interventional drug or radiotherapy trials to observational studies.

Every year, more than 1500 of our cancer patients decide to take part in clinical trials.

Clinical trials videos

Please watch the videos below to learn more about our oncology and haematology clinical trials.

My clinical trials family

South Londoner Andreas discusses the support he receives from the clinical trials team and how the relationship he has with the team gives him confidence and hope.

  • My clinical trials family – video transcript

    [Text] Every year, more than 1500 cancer patients at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust decide to take part in clinical trials.

    Andreas: My name’s Andreas Georgiou and as the name suggests I’m Greek, from Cyprus.

    I came here at a very young age when I was 11 years old. I’ve worked as a motor mechanic for 50 years; I had my own business very local to the hospital near here, for 20 years.

    I’ve also been in the Greek army, where I was a tank driver for two years. I’ve had a very interesting life.

    I was diagnosed four years ago with advanced prostate cancer, which is untreatable.

    The consultant at the Pru [Princess Royal], which is where I was originally, suggested if I wanted to volunteer for the clinical trials, which I did – I didn’t have second thoughts.

    She explained to me that if there were any problems, or if there were side effects, they would help you get over them.

    They’ve been very good at it anyway. All I can say is that I haven’t looked back on my first decision.

    I’ve already done five trials up to the moment. I’ve had no big, major side effects.

    You get 24-hour, seven-days-a-week support from the actual staff at Guy's. If I’ve got any problems whatsoever I can phone up and they will ask me to come in straight away and they will look after me.

    Since I’ve been coming here I’ve met so many people – doctors, nurses and all the staff, and I feel at home coming to the hospital.

    It feels like a family to me because they’ve been so good to me. If anybody asked me to give them advice about doing trials, I’d say 'Yes, definitely'. It’s done me a world of good.

    Plus it gives you hope, which a lot of people lose. So at the moment I’ve got a lot of hope, and I know I’m not going to last forever, but as long as I can.

    [Text] This film was made as part of the patient experience programme. With thanks to all the patients and staff who took part. For more information about taking part in clinical trials, askOHCT@gstt.nhs.uk.

Our team: research nurse

Research nurse Kelly discusses the many roles nurses play within the research team; from recruiting patients and obtaining data, to advising patients about their treatments and, most importantly, looking after their safety and well-being.

  • Our team: research nurses – video transcript

    [Text] Every year, more than 1500 cancer patients at Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust decide to take part in clinical trials.

    Kelly: My name is Kelly Radford. I'm a research nurse for the oncology and haematology clinical trials department and I look after the skin lymphoma and the brain tumour clinical trials.

    My job involves recruiting patients to the clinical trials, looking after their safety while they're on the trials, making sure that their ethical rights are upheld, making sure that the trials run according to the protocols and all of the ethical principles and legislation. But my primary job is to look after patient safety.

    I'm usually the first person that a patient will call if they have a problem and because I know them well I can offer them some reassurance, support, advice – whatever is needed.

    People can feel anxious about going on to a clinical trial. They don't know what to expect. A lot of the time it will be that they are concerned about a side effect or they're feeling unwell. Then I give them advice as to what to do or I liaise with the doctors and get back to them as to what would be the best thing, whether to go to A&E, go to the GP, come and see us in the clinic here.

    Often it's just giving, because we have to keep informing the patient of their clinical trial participation the whole way throughout, so it's just making sure that they're informed about what to expect next, what the procedures are that they'll be doing next time they come in, things like that.

    So for me the most inspiring thing about my work is the relationship that I develop with my patients. I find it very rewarding. And I also feel quite proud that I'm hopefully contributing to a cure for cancer.

    Text: This film was made as part of the patient experience programme. With thanks to all the patients and staff who took part. For more information about taking part in clinical trials, askOHCT@gstt.nhs.uk.

Contact us

Email:
askOHCT@gstt.nhs.uk

Take part in a clinical trial

Find out how you can take part in a clinical trial at Guy’s and St Thomas’ and what is involved.

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